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New York Times: Can Orange Glasses Help You Sleep Better?

Most evenings, before watching late-night comedy or reading emails on his phone, Matt Nicoletti puts on a pair of orange-colored glasses that he bought for $8 off the Internet. “My girlfriend thinks I look ridiculous in them,” he said. But Mr. Nicoletti, a 30-year-old hospitality consultant in Denver, insists that the glasses, which can block certain wavelengths of light emitted by electronic screens, make it easier to sleep. Studies have shown that such light, especially from the blue part of the spectrum, inhibits the body’s production of melatonin, a hormone that helps people fall asleep. Options are growing for blocking blue light, though experts caution that few have been adequately tested for effectiveness and the best solution remains avoiding brightly...

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NBA Waking Up to Dangers of Blue Light and Sleep Deprivation

WHEN Cheri Mah talks to NBA players, she'll tell them how poor sleep (or lack thereof) negatively affects on-court performance. She'll mention how chronic inadequate sleep builds "sleep debt" that must be reduced over time. Mah, a sleep research fellow at the University of California San Francisco Human Performance Center, also brings up another issue: blue light. It's emitted from televisions, computer screens, tablets, smartphones, and at night, it suppresses the body's attempt to produce melatonin, a hormone that helps induce sleep. "Most of them are pretty surprised," said Mah, who said she has worked with thousands of collegiate and professional athletes since 2002. "That's really because no one has told them that before and they didn't realize it could...

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Phones need 'bed mode' to protect sleep

Smartphones, tablets and e-readers should have an automatic "bedtime mode" that stops them disrupting people's sleep, says a leading doctor. Prof Paul Gringras argued the setting should filter out the blue light that delays the body clock and keeps people awake later into the evening. The doctor, from Evelina Children's Hospital in London, said every new model was "bluer and brighter". He said manufacturers needed to show more "responsibility". As it gets darker in the evening, the body starts to produce the sleep hormone melatonin - which helps people nod off. Certain wavelengths of light, those at the blue-green end of the spectrum, can disrupt the system. Prof Gringras was part of a study, published in Frontiers in Public Health,...

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Lack of Sleep is Seriously Messing Up Your Health

We’re all well aware that a limited amount of shut-eye can cause a host of issues, including weight gain, low productivity and mood disorders. Now study authors from University of Colorado have discovered that a lack of sufficient sleep can reduce the body’s sensitivity to insulin, ultimately increasing the risk of diabetes. Researchers analyzed the effects on good and poor quality sleep on a small study of 16 healthy adults. Half of the volunteers initially slept up to five hours a night for five days, in order to reenact a typical workweek. Then for the following five nights, they hit the hay for up to nine hours per night. The other group completed the 10-day test in the opposite order....

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